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APOBEC-induced mutations in human cancers are strongly enriched on the lagging DNA strand during replication.

Overview of attention for article published in Genome Research, January 2016
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • Among the highest-scoring outputs from this source (#35 of 2,385)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (98th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (90th percentile)

Mentioned by

news
12 news outlets
twitter
15 tweeters
facebook
2 Facebook pages

Readers on

mendeley
76 Mendeley
citeulike
5 CiteULike
Title
APOBEC-induced mutations in human cancers are strongly enriched on the lagging DNA strand during replication.
Published in
Genome Research, January 2016
DOI 10.1101/gr.197046.115
Pubmed ID
Authors

Seplyarskiy, Vladimir B, Soldatov, Ruslan A, Popadin, Konstantin Y, Antonarakis, Stylianos E, Bazykin, Georgii A, Nikolaev, Sergey I, Vladimir B. Seplyarskiy, Ruslan A. Soldatov, Konstantin Y. Popadin, Stylianos E. Antonarakis, Georgii A. Bazykin, Sergey I. Nikolaev

Abstract

APOBEC3A and APOBEC3B, cytidine deaminases of the APOBEC family, are among the main factors causing mutations in human cancers. APOBEC deaminates cytosines in single-stranded DNA (ssDNA). A fraction of the APOBEC-induced mutations occur as clusters ("kataegis") in single-stranded DNA produced during repair of double-stranded breaks (DSBs). However, the properties of the remaining 87% of nonclustered APOBEC-induced mutations, the source and the genomic distribution of the ssDNA where they occur, are largely unknown. By analyzing genomic and exomic cancer databases, we show that >33% of dispersed APOBEC-induced mutations occur on the lagging strand during DNA replication, thus unraveling the major source of ssDNA targeted by APOBEC in cancer. Although methylated cytosine is generally more mutation-prone than nonmethylated cytosine, we report that methylation reduces the rate of APOBEC-induced mutations by a factor of roughly two. Finally, we show that in cancers with extensive APOBEC-induced mutagenesis, there is almost no increase in mutation rates in late replicating regions (contrary to other cancers). Because late-replicating regions are depleted in exons, this results in a 1.3-fold higher fraction of mutations residing within exons in such cancers. This study provides novel insight into the APOBEC-induced mutagenesis and describes the peculiarity of the mutational processes in cancers with the signature of APOBEC-induced mutations.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 15 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 76 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
France 2 3%
Italy 2 3%
Russian Federation 1 1%
United Kingdom 1 1%
Poland 1 1%
Unknown 69 91%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 24 32%
Student > Ph. D. Student 19 25%
Student > Master 9 12%
Student > Bachelor 8 11%
Student > Postgraduate 4 5%
Other 12 16%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 29 38%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 28 37%
Medicine and Dentistry 11 14%
Immunology and Microbiology 3 4%
Computer Science 2 3%
Other 3 4%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 105. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 05 July 2017.
All research outputs
#83,461
of 8,467,419 outputs
Outputs from Genome Research
#35
of 2,385 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#5,241
of 324,047 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Genome Research
#4
of 43 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 8,467,419 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 99th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 2,385 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 13.0. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 98% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 324,047 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 98% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 43 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 90% of its contemporaries.